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Kaufman County Republicans’ Big Disaster Could Cost Them In November

After allegations of embezzlement rocked the Kaufman County GOP, new accusations of election fraud surface.

Earlier today, the alt-right publication, Current Revolt published an article about how thousands of dollars were missing from the Kaufman County GOP’s bank account. According to Current Revolt, the GOP Chair, Coby Pritchett, blamed a hacker, even though many transactions went directly to his own Facebook friends.

In 2020, when I did the five-part series about the history of white supremacy in Kaufman County, titled Staying In Your Lane, I was fortunate enough to make friends with several people in the county, including a few people involved in the local Republican club. I reached out to my contacts this morning to ask them about the accusations from Current Revolt, and it turns out there is a lot more to this story.

Who is Coby Pritchett?

The man in the picture above is Coby Pritchett, once a staffer for Representative Keith Bell and current Kaufman County GOP Chairman.

The previous Kaufman County GOP Chairman, Jimmy Weaver, died of Covid last October. However, before Weaver passed away, Pritchett had his hands wrapped around the Kaufman County Republican Party.

On September 30, 2021, the party held a special meeting to elect a new interim chairman. Unfortunately, of the 30 GOP precinct chairs, only 14 showed up to this meeting.

That’s when Pritchett allegedly called for outside help. According to a Kaufman County Republican Precinct Chair, who wishes to remain anonymous, five of the votes that went to Pritchett were from people who were never sworn in as Precinct Chairs or previously attended any GOP meetings.

According to CEC insiders, not only were the votes for Pritchett from people not involved in the party, but Pritchett himself was also unknown to county insiders. Which begs the question, where did Coby Pritchett come from and who has he been working with?

According to Kaufman County Conservative Republicans, Congressman Lance Gooden is the man behind Coby Pritchett.

Lance Gooden is one of the worst Congressmen in America. He hasn’t done one thing for the American people and spends his days on Twitter telling one lie after another. Those are usually two strong indications of a Republican favorite. But it would so seem that the Kaufman County Conservative Republicans don’t agree.

(Note: The Kaufman County Conservative Republicans are a different group than the Kaufman County Republicans.)

According to the Conservative group, their county party has been highjacked, and the two GOP members, Lance Gooden and their local DA, and Lance Gooden financed robocalls against their Republican picks.

True or not, Republican infighting is both delicious and entertaining.

Allegedly, after Pritchett took over as the GOP chair, he fired their treasurer Valerie Villareal (who then founded the Kaufman County Conservative Republicans). Then Pritchett rebranded the entire Kaufman County GOP.

That’s when the money trouble started.

In March, Coby Pritchett was on the ballot for the Republican County Chair and won. So whether his first election was illegitimate or not, he’s legitimate now.

Here are the questions we all should be asking?

As county chair, all Kaufman County Republican candidates must file for office through their county offices. Therefore, in December, if Pritchett was an illegitimate chair, and he signed and filed that paperwork, those candidates should have been invalidated by the Secretary of State and kept off the ballot in March.

Does that mean that all Kaufman County Republican candidates should not be on the ballots in Kaufman County in November?

This story is just unfolding, and we’ll update you as it progresses.

We reached out to Coby Pritchett’s attorney and the Kaufman County Conservative Republicans for comment, but neither replied.

Stay tuned.

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